Several Reasons Why I Believe Hunting Should Be Outlawed

I am well aware of the laws regarding hunting for “sport” that already exist. I am aware of what animals are protected species and endangered, and that laws forbid those animals to be killed. Despite those laws, humans still kill wolves and claim they thought it was a coyote. Humans go to other countries and kill animals because those laws are more lenient. I would prefer that this hunting for “sport” so that you can wear it’s fur or mount it’s head on your wall, ought to be outlawed everywhere on this entire planet. However, that’s an unrealistic expectation. What is realistic, however, is banning hunting for “sport” in the United States. No exceptions. That does not include hunting for food, or indigenous people whose cultures embrace nature and only hunt out of necessity.

1. The damage to the ecosystem.

I’m not the first argue this, and I certainly won’t be the last. Endangered, protected or neither, whenever you alter the population beyond what nature intends, you cause damage. Wolves are endangered because they have been hunted to the point where their population has difficulty sustaining itself. Wolves prey on deer, mostly. But if there are less wolves, there are more deer. Some people believe the solution to this is to hunt deer to balance it out. Let’s say you have 100 deer, and 30 wolves in one area. You kill half of the deer, and half of the wolves. Now you have 50 deer, and 15 wolves. Doesn’t really balance out, does it?

2. Hunting for “sport” is ignorant.

The massive difference between hunting practiced by indigenous people, and “sport” hunters, is that the first method makes use of every part of the animal, and multiple tracking methods. Methods which require an understanding of these animals, where to find them, how to approach and how to track them if they are able to run after shot. Sport hunters don’t typically do this. It is mostly sitting around and waiting, or laying traps with bait and hoping something gets caught.

3. You lack appreciation for nature and life.

Gaining enjoyment from killing an animal and using it’s body parts as decoration is a sociopath behavior. If you want to experience nature, go to your local hiking trail and do just that, hike. Take a camera with you, and document what you find. Whether you want to admit it or not, you are a part of nature, therefore, you should learn to be a part of it. If you ruin nature, it will not be there for you when you need it most. I’d like to think animal populations that have been at the mercy of hunting, feel like nature cannot be there for them when they need it most.

4. You aren’t killing only one animal.

Even if you go out and kill one deer every season, you aren’t killing just one deer. Males are less plentiful than females, so the more you kill, the fewer can breed their genetics. Without genetic diversity, a population suffers illness and shortened lifespans. If you kill the dominant female in a wolf pack, the pecking order changes dramatically. The wolves will fight for leadership, and at times seriously injure or kill each other. In other parts of the world, if you kill a lion, the pride is in danger of being invaded by rogue males. Lionesses will violently defend their cubs, which could lead to their death or the death of the invading males. If a male succeeds in taking over the pride, he will kill all of the cubs.

5. This behavior can be self-deprecating.

It’s not just that some folks will think wrongly of you for your chosen hobby. You are desensitizing yourself to the well being of another being. A good example is Sarah Palin’s many hunting trips, and her recent approval of her young son stepping on the family dog. She has decided her dog’s discomfort is okay, and she has also taught her son that causing the discomfort of the dog is okay. By and large, people who support and practice sport hunting also participate in other groups which do not have the best interests of the public in mind (specifically Republicans and related groups).

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